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07-11-2007, 12:10 PM,
#1
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This is a question about the nomenclature convention, or, more specifically, the spelling convention.

Sometimes I see the italicized spelling Hyriopsis cumingi or Hyriopsis schlegeli, and other times I see the italicized spelling Hyriopsis cumingii or Hyriopsis schlegelii. Which is correct: a single or double "i" at the end?

The question goes to the naming/spelling convention. According to the taxonomy experts, single or double "i" ?
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07-11-2007, 04:32 PM,
#2
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Hello !

I am not a specialist of nomenclature but I can confirm you that cumingii must be written with 2 "i". It's a common species name used for many shell species : <i>Cypraea cumingii</i>, <i>Vexillum cumingii </i>etc...

Concerning <i>schlegelii</i> , I do not know. Usually books are a good place to confirm this kind of problem...

EDIT : I made some search, it seems to be <i>schlegelii</i>, 95% sure

Reagards,
David  <span class="petit">--Last edited by David Touitou on 2007-07-11 20:35:10 --</span>
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07-12-2007, 12:54 PM,
#3
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Thanks for the reply.

Any species named Genus cumingii was named for Hugh Cuming, a Brit and contemporary of Charles Darwin. Hugh Cuming was a sailmaker in I forget which South American country on the Pacific coast. I think it was Chile. He traveled the world exploring for mollusks and was first to record many, including Hyriopsis cumingii and Pinctada margaritifera cumingii. Presumably, Hyriopsis schlegelii was first recorded by a man named Schlegel.

So, I'm wondering, why add a double i at the end? Do two i characters next to each other mean something in Latin?

Early
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07-12-2007, 08:52 PM,
#4
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Hello,

If I find anything concerning this, I will contact you via the forum<img src="images/smiley/wink.gif" alt="" border="0" />

Regards,
DAVID
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07-15-2007, 04:54 PM,
#5
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Hello,

I have just received the last issue of Xenophora magazine (AFC publication : <a href="http://www.xenophora.org/" target="_blank"><!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.xenophora.org/">http://www.xenophora.org/</a><!-- m --></a> .
And guess what is inside ? The explanation of thye ii mystery  <img src="images/smiley/lol.gif" alt="" border="0" />

When some dedicate a species to someone (human) he transforms
the name with "us". Then Two cases appears :

<u>The name does not already finish by a "i"</u>
====> Name = <b>cuvier</b> => <i>Conus Cuvierus</i>
Then "us" bcomes "i"================><i>Conus Cuvieri</i>

<u>The name does already finish by a "i"</u>
====> Name =<b> cuvieri </b>=> <i>Conus Cuvierius</i>
Then "ius" bcomes "ii"================><i>Conus Cuvierii</i>

I hope my english is not too bad  Wink

Regards,
DAVID  <span class="petit">--Last edited by David Touitou on 2007-07-15 20:55:18 --</span>
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07-21-2007, 02:08 PM,
#6
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Thanks for the information about the single or double i at the end of the species name.

That would mean that any species named for Hugh Cuming, whose last name does not end in an "i", would be spelled "cumingi", correct?

And assuming that Hyriopsis schlegeli (italics) was named for a man of German ancestry named Schlegel (sure looks and sounds to me like the German language), whose name does not end in an "i", would be spelled as typed above, correct?

Early
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07-23-2007, 05:07 PM,
#7
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Hello !

Exactly but the author can latinize cuming as
cunmingus or can decide to latinize cuming as
cumingius... I guess the author latinized with a ius<img src="images/smiley/wink.gif" alt="" border="0" />

bye
DAVID
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